Man dumps bucket of water on homeless woman from San Francisco rooftop in viral video

As San Francisco’s homeless crisis grows more dire, its residents have repeatedly come under fire for mistreatment of those in the homeless community — from accusations of “anti-homeless” architecture to threats of violence against homeless camps.
Now, a video that shows a man from a rooftop in San Francisco pouring a bucket of water on a homeless woman has gone viral, forcing viewers to grapple with cruelty toward the homeless population.
The video, first reported by NBC Bay Area, shows a man dumping a bucket of water from a rooftop onto a homeless woman, her encampment and her belongings.
Witnesses told NBC Bay Area that it wasn’t the first time, and that repeated instances of water dumping have taken place in the same building — presumably to ward off homeless people.
The instance that was recorded on video, The Guardian noted, was the second attack on the woman in the same day. She was attempting to move her belongings following the first attack.
The San Francisco Police Department encourages the victim to step forward and report the crime, officials told USA TODAY. Neither individual has been identified.
They classify this as a misdemeanor battery, NBC Bay Area said.
A Twitter user, Jim Cruz-Youll, is offering a $500 reward for any information regarding the identity of the attacker, which was matched by multiple others on the platform.
“Homeless women are frequent victims of sexual assault and domestic abuse,” said Cruz-Youll. “Vigilantes can’t be allowed to attack people and just wander away without consequences. I hope the reward will encourage people to step up on the record with information so that there might be a chance at justice.”
The San Francisco Human Services Agency did not respond to requests for comment from USA TODAY. (source: https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/06/26/san-francisco-man-dumps-bucket-water-homeless-woman-goes-viral/1569285001/ )

How to find a good residential lot to build a home

Let’s admit we’ve all dreamt of building our dream homes from scratch and whilst it might seem like a far-off fantasy more and more people are choosing to build their own new homes. While it can be easy to build your own home, you can’t just point to any random bit of grass and decide that’s where you’ll build your foundations. To help you out we’ve gathered some nine great tips_ on finding that perfect residential lot to help you build the house of your dreams.

 – Look for plots in existing neighbourhoods.

Not all land is great for building on and there’s been many cases of hopeful new families splashing the cash on the “perfect” plot of land only to have to spend a great deal more trying to make the land work for them. If the land exists where houses are already built, then it’s more than likely that the land will be perfect for building on.

 – Visit the land you’re considering buying.

I feel like this goes without saying but better safe than sorry! If you visit the area the land you hope to buy is then you can get a real feel for what it’ll be like when your house is built there. You can get a glimpse into what the local life is like and whether the area is too busy or loud and what the traffic is like. If you can’t visit the land for some reason, then take advantage of online maps like Google Maps to check out the area.

 – Look at online land listings.

There’s plenty of land being sold online on websites like Rightmove, S1 Homes and Gumtree and it’s something you don’t want to miss out on. It can be quicker and easier than going through a real estate agent (who don’t always deal with land!) and you don’t even have to leave the house. The best part about most of these websites is that they’re totally free to use and have all sorts of land of all shapes and sizes for sale. If you’re stuck to a tight budget looking online might be the best option for you.
If you’re looking for a place in a woodland area then check out Waterview Estates in Little Rock, AR. For those with a family, this is a great place to live.

 – Talk to real estate agents.

I know what I said about estate agents not always selling plots of land but the ones that do, really know their stuff. A lot can go into buying land and building a home. For example, you need to know about what permits you might need and what the local building codes are like. Real estate agents can really be your best friend when you’re looking for information.

 – Watch out for coastal land.

Land close to the beach might seem appealing but houses along the coast are a major risk for damage from the weather, flooding or even cliffside erosion which can leave your bank account going dry. If being near bodies of water is part of your property dreams aim for land that’s near canals, lakes or streams as they’re much less likely to cause you grief.

 – Double check the property conditions.

While streams can be much less of a hazard than the ocean, a little stream could turn into a raging river when the slightest bit of rain hits. You might have dreams of the perfect patio in your back garden could will mean nothing the land is covered in swamps and marshlands. Keep an eye out for a bizarrely dead grass and vegetation as it could be a sign there’s some serious environmental issues going on. If you don’t double check these simple things it can lead to disasters that could cost, you a lot of money.

 – Keep an eye-out for undesirable land.

We previously mentioned some land can’t be built on but some land that’s on slopes or hills, that are weird shapes or are considered “fill-in” land might be what you’re looking for. These types of land tend to be a great deal cheaper than more tradition plots of land as they’re less likely to sell. Who knows these types of land might be exactly what you’re looking for. However, some slopes could cost you as they might need some landscaping to flatten them down a bit so consult with a professional if you’re unsure.

 – Similarly, consider land that already contains an existing property. 

Land that has property already has structures built onto it most likely is safe to build on as it’s been built on previously. Though we recommend we double check this as land conditions can change over time. However, if you this an option you will have to hire a demolition team but if the land has a very run down, derelict building on it then there’s a chance you could get it cheap if you can find the right experts.

 – Remember to think about planning permission. 

Some people who sell their land make their offers with planning permission ready to go but some don’t which can be a major inconvenience. In some areas waiting for planning permission can be lengthy, which can obviously lead to some major problems when planning and building your dream home, so we recommend you ensure the plot your buying includes planning permission.

So, there you have some tips_, tricks and things to consider when buying a plot of land for your dream home. We understand most of these are really just basic common sense but there can be so many things to think about that the simplest of things can get missed. Just stick to your gut, follow these tips_ and listen to the professionals and there’s no way you can go wrong.

(Source: https://bulawayo24.com/index-id-lifestyle-sc-dose+of+encouragement-byo-157238.html )

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Young entrepreneur helps clothe the homeless in Las Vegas

Eighteen-year-old Dylan Sanglay, who created his own clothing company and uses proceeds to buy clothes for the homeless, poses at his home in the Sunrise Manor area of Las Vegas on Sunday, Aug. 26 ...

By Mia Sims

On his way home from school one day last September, Dylan Sanglay noticed several homeless men walking along the street. He wondered how he could make their day.
“I’d just gotten out of school and I had a bag of clothes I was about to donate to Goodwill,” Sanglay said. “Instead of donating, I thought I’d use it as a chance to inspire my sister.”
He took the clothes out of the car and gave them to the men. Their smiles, Sanglay said, sparked something inside him. For his birthday that October, instead of a celebration, he wanted to be of service to his community.
“I organized a bunch of clothes — men’s, women, kids, everything — and I went downtown,” Sanglay said. “I started giving them one by one to all the homeless individuals who were out there. After that, I started doing it every month.”
Now, Sanglay partners with nonprofit organizations such as Project 150, Convoy of Hope, CARE Complex and Help USA to provide clothes to homeless adults and youth. Sanglay’s community work is only a portion of what he does as an aspiring entrepreneur. He buys clothes for the homeless using the proceeds from his clothing company Dsigner_etc., a clothing line he started via social media.
“I buy new and used trendy clothing from stores like Goodwill and Savers,” Sanglay said. “I get a lot of support from my customers. They either pay me through PayPal or in person and I deliver the clothing to them. It was easy for me last year because a lot of my clients were in high school so I’d sell though there. I’m going to market my way to college now.”
According to his mother, Lisa Lopez Sanglay, 47, Dylan has always had an entrepreneurial spirit — even in third grade when he would ask her to buy lollipops so he could resell them.
“He’s always had that drive,” Lisa said. “He’s not your typical 18-year-old. He knows what he wants. And he always focuses on a bigger picture. When he and his sister were younger, I would take them to Catholic Charities and when I volunteered, I made sure they signed up with me. I’m from the Philippines. I’ve seen the worst of it. I always wanted my kids to stay grounded and see how fortunate they are.”
A recent graduate of the Southeast Career Technical Academy, Sanglay graduated with a 4.1 GPA majoring in sports medicine and was offered 11 full-ride scholarships at schools across the country. He’s a freshman at UNLV, studying kinesiology and plans to keep juggling the duties of his clothing business and community service.
“My overall goal is to make a difference in the world,” Sanglay said. “I want to expand this business throughout the world and inspire those around me, mainly the youth. The youth are our future. I just want to be a role model.”
Contact Mia Sims on msims@reviewjournal.com. Follow @miasims___ on Twitter.

(Source: https://www.reviewjournal.com/life/fashion/young-entrepreneur-helps-clothe-the-homeless-in-las-vegas/ )

The housing shortage in California is creating a state of crisis

written by Laurie Edwards-Tate Jul 10, 2018

SAN DIEGO. California, with its attractive cities such as San Francisco and Hollywood, plentiful parklands, expansive Pacific Ocean and desirable year-round climate — can mesmerize vacationers and snowbirds alike. Wishing to escape harsh weather conditions or simply seeking a change of pace, the Golden State soon becomes a serious consideration for many who are desiring to relocate.
California dreaming? Not so much if you consider the state’s ginormous housing shortage. That shortage is so bad in California that it is creating a state of crisis.

THE HIGH COST OF HOUSING IN CALIFORNIA

But what is oftentimes overlooked by California dreamers is the state’s high cost of living. Overlooked as well: the high prices for housing and apartment rentals, some of the highest in the nation.
California wannabes might be determined to find a way to live the California lifestyle. But they are very possibly ignoring the underlying facts influencing what it might cost them to qualify to buy or to rent

The housing shortage in California is creating a state of crisis.

LOW HOUSING SUPPLY CAUSES ESCALATING HOME PRICES

For those who currently own a home, the increase in housing values is highly desirable. But for first-time home buyers, however, the California real estate market makes it nearly impossible for many to afford a home. Only around 29 percent of Californians today can afford a median priced home of about $518,500.00.

Qualifying for a median priced home requires a total household annual income of $81,690.00. The estimated monthly loan payment is $2,720.00 (depending upon loan terms, down payment and the effective interest rate), according to the California Realtors Association.

In 2017, California Housing and Community Development Department estimated 3.5 million new homes would be needed to meet population growth.

SOLVING THE SHORTAGE OF CALIFORNIA HOUSING

The California Housing and Community Development Department estimates that the state needs 180,000 new homes each year to keep pace with housing demand. It follows that California should be a builder’s paradise. With millions of new homes needed over the next 20 years, the building industry could also be a positive source for creating new jobs.

However, the supply of new housing is falling dangerously short. The reasons for this are many.

For example, in 2017, approximately 110,000-115,000 building permits were requested or granted permitting the building of new California homes, according to the Construction Industry Research Board. However, estimates report approximately 70,000 fewer homes get built each year than are actually needed.

An a recent interview with a member of the California Building Industry Association, revealed a surprising multitude of barriers which prevent building badly needed new homes in California. This is especially true for those within a range of affordability.

THE COST OF OVER-REGULATION AND OTHER BARRIERS

California’s current list of regulatory barriers and cost-drivers includes

Slow permit processing
California Environmental Quality Act
Law suits from private citizens
Lumber shortages creating increasing costs
Rising materials costs
Increasing labor costs

( Source: https://www.commdiginews.com/business-2/housing-shortage-crisis-california-104294/ )

Hunger And Homelessness Are Widespread Among College Students, Study Finds

A new study from Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab found more than a third of college students can’t always afford to eat or have stable housing.

As college students grapple with the rising costs of classes and books, mortgaging their futures with student loans in exchange for a diploma they’re gambling will someday pay off, it turns out many of them are in great financial peril in the present, too.

More than a third of college students don’t always have enough to eat and they lack stable housing, according to a survey published Tuesday by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab.

Overall the study concluded 36 percent of college students say they are food insecure. Another 36 percent say they are housing insecure, while 9 percent report being homeless. The results are largely the same as last year’s survey, which included fewer students.
National Survey Shows High Rates Of Hungry And Homeless Community College Students
NPR Ed
National Survey Shows High Rates Of Hungry And Homeless Community College Students

The 2018 numbers are even higher when broken out to include only community college students. Forty-two percent indicated they struggled the most to get adequate food, as measured by the researchers’ scale. Nine percent said they had gone at least one day during the last month without eating because they lacked the money. And 46 percent said they had difficulty paying for housing and utilities.

Sara Goldrick-Rab, professor of higher-education policy at Temple University and the lead author of the report for the past three years, told NPR that while conditions remain dire for students from low-income families, the burden of covering these basic necessities is spreading into the middle class.

For poor students, she said, “It really undermines their ability to do well in school. Their grades suffer, their test scores appear to be lower, and overall, their chances of graduating are slimmer. They can barely escape their conditions of poverty long enough to complete their degrees.”

Whereas, middle class students “wouldn’t be going through these issues if they weren’t in college” because “their resources pale in comparison to those high college prices.”

For those students facing food insecurity, it means they have trouble getting enough to eat on a daily basis, often leading to skipped meals, weight loss and limited access to nutritious foods.

Housing instability can mean a student is at risk of eviction, behind on utilities payments, or actually homeless, although according to the researchers, homelessness can take on different forms. For instance, it may include students living in a shelter, as well as anyone “couch surfing” — staying with friends — or roaming across campus at night, catching short windows of sleep as they move from one empty building to another.

The report focused on 43,000 students at 66 institutions — 31 community colleges and 35 four-year universities — in 20 states and Washington, D.C. Students volunteered to participate and researchers say it is a non-random sample.

However, Goldrick-Rab and her colleagues have touted it as “the largest national assessment of basic needs security among four-year students.”

While the survey did not include any University of California respondents, most of the findings in the current annual study parallel those found by researchers with the UC Berkeley’s Basic Needs Security Work Group, which, in 2016 determined 42 percent of student in the UC system were food insecure.

Other notable findings in Goldrick-Rab’s study include:

More than 60 percent of former foster youth who completed this survey were food insecure and housing insecure, and almost 1 in 4 had experienced homelessness in the last year.
21 percent of homeless students said they felt unsafe where they live.
37 percent of community college students and 29 percent of four-year students reported the food they’d bought just didn’t last and they didn’t have money to buy more.

Among the most surprising findings in the survey, Goldrick-Rab said, “Is that homeless college students devote as much time to the classroom and to studying as do college students who are not homeless. However, they also work more, they commute more, spend more time taking care of other people and they sleep less.”

That is why she is urging higher education institutions to double down on providing services to help financially strapped students graduate. “Because these people have clearly exhibited a resilience that almost any employer would benefit from.”
(source: https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/04/03/599197919/hunger-and-homelessness-are-widespread-among-college-students-study-finds )

US homeless population grows for first time in seven years

Published December 25, 2017 at 5:36 PM
Updated December 25, 2017 at 5:38 PM
The U.S. homeless population has risen for the first time since 2010. According to a government study, there are now more than 550,000 homeless people across the country. Their plight gets extra attention this time of year, as the homeless prepare for winter across the northern part of the country
CGTN’s Dan Williams reports.
Under a road in the center of Chicago, some of the city’s homeless attempt to keep warm. Their possessions, including bundles of clothes and blankets, lie strewn across the sidewalks.
This is where many of Chicago’s homeless are preparing for a harsh winter. It’s estimated that some 82,000 are homeless here; many living on the street, including Joseph and his uncle.
“At night time, even with blankets and all of that, we’d still be freezing. This concrete gets so cold it cracks,” Jason said. “Since I have been out here, seven years, I have seen about six people down here pass away from the cold.”
Another homeless man, Kenneth, told me about the desperate lengths he has to go to stay warm.
“If a friend can’t help me, I stay on the train. You know, back and forth. The day, start all over again. You see my buddy and all, broke down like I broke down now,” he said as he started to cry.
According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, homelessness across the country is on the rise for the first time in seven years.
It’s estimated that the number of homeless in the country now stands at about 554,000, a one percent increase from a year ago. This is in part because of rising rents with incomes not keeping pace.
The homeless in Chicago say they are constantly being chased away from other downtown locations. Some say their belongings, tents, and blankets have been seized by the local authorities, making their situation all the more precarious.
The Chicago Coalition for the Homeless is calling for changes.
“Far too often, the city, the government approaches homelessness as a nuisance and uses the law and the criminalization of homelessness as a way to address it,” according to Doug Schenkelberg. “That doesn’t really help anyone. The goal when they do that is to get homelessness out of the line of sight.”
There is some help, however. A number of charities and community outreach programs attempt to provide a safety net.
But funding is tight.
A Safe Haven Foundation provides housing, as well as job training, to help people become self-sufficient.
“I had an addiction to drugs. Marijuana to be specific. And also alcohol,” program participant Davawn told me. “And that was stopping me from being as successful as I could be. They’ve got different programs here like welder, landscaping, culinary arts. There should be one of these programs in every state.”
Davawn is one of the luckier ones. He hopes it won’t be long before he has a place he can call home. But for many others, the only certainty is the prospect of a brutal and unforgiving winter. (Source: https://america.cgtn.com/2017/12/25/chicago-usa-homeless-population-rising-growing )

Oakland using storage sheds to house homeless in vacant lot

OAKLAND, Calif. (CBS) — A dozen people will get a fresh start in a new homeMonday as the city of Oakland welcomes the first group of homeless people to live in a vacant lot set up with storage sheds.
On Monday morning, city workers were putting the finishing touches on the experimental shelters. Plans to use the storage sheds for temporary housing in Oakland were first announced early in October.
A group of 20 “Tuff Sheds” have been set up on the lot at Bush and 6th streets

The city of Oakland will provided services like social workers and health providers to the community.
The units measure 10 feet by 12 feet and look like little cabins. City officials say each one will house two people.
While the 20 sheds will be able to house 40 people, it is just a start. More than 2,000 people in Oakland are without homes.
“On the long term, we need to build more units. Luckily Oakland passed Measure KK which includes $100 million toward housing. Alameda County passed Measure A1, which is $6 million towards affordable housing. ”
This new community is located just feet from sprawling homeless encampments.
The program, among the first tests for the city working to tackle the homeless crisis.
When asked if Oakland residents should expect to see more of these lots transformed into communities with storage sheds, DeVries replied, “If this is successful and we can identify the resources to replicate this, we absolutely will.” (source: http://www.wusa9.com/news/nation-world/oakland-using-storage-sheds-to-house-homeless-in-vacant-lot/496991977 )

America’s Tent Cities for the Homeless

Though the overall number of homeless people in the United States has been in a slow decline in recent years, homelessness has risen sharply in larger cities. More than 500,000 people were homeless in the United States at the end of last year, according to a report by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Many who find themselves living on the streets find a level of community and security in homeless encampments—whether the tent cities are sanctioned or unofficial. Gathered here are images of some of these tent cities, from Seattle, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Las Cruces, and Honolulu. Though residents say they enjoy the stability of the camps, they still live in uncertainty, as many cities have clamped down in recent years, carrying out evictions and tearing down the tents. (Source: https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2016/02/americas-tent-cities-for-the-homeless/462450/ )

FREE DOWNLOAD: HOMES FOR THE HOMELESS

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Five places where land is free

scenic downtown Camden, Maine where they're giving away free landIn the spirit of settling the wild, wild West, some communities are giving away free land lots. What’s the catch? You have to agree to build a house (or park a mobile home) and live in it. For the most part, the places doing this are rural communities without much in the way of work opportunities. But there are definitely some upsides and we can think of worse places to wait out the recession than near a mountain stream in Alaska. Besides, doesn’t the whole world work virtually now, or is that just my hemisphere?
The concept is certainly not new. Homesteading incentives dating from 1862 helped settle the far reaches of the country. And as population density increased, communities thrived. Some communities today simply need more people. Land, they’ve got plenty of, so why not give it away? People pay taxes and that allows schools to stay open, roads to be built, public services to be paid for.
What are you likely to get? A few years ago, the Alaskan town of Anderson — smack in the state’s interior, loaded with spruce trees and views of the Northern lights and Mount McKinley — put 26 plots of land up for grabs. The town of 300 has no gas station, no grocery store and no traffic lights. It also pays no property taxes, no state income taxes, has no crime and no traffic. Summers are gorgeous with temperatures reaching 90. Winters, well, winters are a different story; the weather can get to minus 60.
The federal government no longer gives away free land (it sells it at fair market value), so if you get something in the mail about the U.S. government’s land giveaways, it’s a scam. But small communities in many states including Alaska, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and Wisconsin still do. In most cases, they are local programs intended to reverse the depopulation of small towns and each one has its own set of rules about who qualifies and what you must do once you get the land.
In Nebraska, what you build has to have a taxable value of at least $100,000. In Alaska, you have to be a U.S. citizen and live in Alaska for a year before you can claim land — which seems to run contrary to the stated goal of trying to draw new residents, but we’d pay good money to hear former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin explain it.
Here’s a sampling of what we found for free.

1) Several small cities in rural Kansas will give you a land lot if you agree to fashion housing of at least 1,000 square feet on it. Mobile homes are welcome, and we’ll be sure to wave as yours flies by in the next tornado. If one lot isn’t large enough and you’d like to garden, the city of Marquette, Kansas would be pleased as punch to just give you a second lot adjacent to the first, also for free, says its website. These are developed lots, by the way — they already have water, sewer and electricity.
2) Atwood Kansas, population 2,600, is also offering free land to anyone willing to move their family to their community and build a new home on one of these lots. If 2,600 people sounds too rural for you, they are quick to point out that another 45,000 people (and probably even more cattle) can be found within an hour’s drive. Rush hour traffic isn’t an issue.
3) Elwood, Nebraska, with just 761 residents, bills itself as a “great place to find a home.” They aren’t giving away much in terms of land, but it’s worth a look if you want to live in the county seat.
4) Marne, Iowa is giving away what appears to be attractive-looking lots with well-established trees — either that or someone went a little crazy with PhotoShop. The town, settled in 1875, has 149 residents — down from the original 617. The city of Marne’s website features the winners of the apple pie baking contest, as well as a call for a community prayer for a resident deployed to Iraq and the news that someone’s nephew from Australia was visiting. You New Yorkers are just lining up, aren’t you?
5) Lest you think businesses are being left out of the free-land loop, some communities aren’t waiting for any federal stimulus money to create jobs. They’re doing it on their own. Muskegon, Michigan is giving away free land for companies that create new industrial jobs. You get five acres for 25 jobs; create 100 jobs and get 30 acres. The sites they are giving away have full utilities and easy access to highways, a deep-water port, the railroads and the Muskegon County Airport. If that pot isn’t sweet enough for you, the city also will throw in free season tickets to the Lumberjacks hockey team or a free boat slip at Harbour Towne Marina in slips the city now owns after prior slip owners didn’t pay their property taxes.

And in coastal Camden, Maine, the city is offering a free 3.5 acre lot to any business that will help generate tourism. They throw in no corporate income tax or sales tax for the first few years and will even pay your insurance premiums. Just bring some jobs with you. ( source: https://www.aol.com/ )

How to get free land and (nearly) free houses in the United States

The economy is tough right now. Unemployment is persistently high. Jobs are hard to find.
What if you want to start over, sort of like the homesteaders of the 1800s? You stake your claim to free land and create your life from scratch.
It can be done today in two different ways. This article points out that there are towns giving away free land:
7 Towns Where Land is Free
Do you get 40 acres? No. But free is free, and the best on the list may be this one:
Homestead Act 2010

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The City of Beatrice currently has three residential lots available. The lots are approximately 83 feet wide and 140 feet deep. The lots are located on the west side of Beatrice. They are within the City limits. The lots all have access to a street, water, sewer, and electricity. There are no buildings on the lots. If you fulfill all of the terms and conditions of the contract you will receive the land at no cost from the City.

Beatrice is a reasonably sized small town and is fairly close to major cities:
[googlemaps http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Beatrice,+NE&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=51.089971,56.601563&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Beatrice,+Gage,+Nebraska&t=h&ll=40.268055,-96.74697&spn=0.022922,0.036478&z=14&iwloc=A&output=embed&w=425&h=350]
If you read through the terms and conditions, you will not be able to build a sod house. But, again, free is free.
If you don’t want to build a house on a lot, what about buying a house that is nearly free? I tried this search at Realtor.com: Detroit houses between $0 and $10,000:
Search Results – Detroit, MI Real Estate and Homes for Sale – $0 to $10,000
I am seeing 1,600 homes that fall into that category. Try it in other cities. You may be surprised.
What did homesteading look like 140 years ago? This video includes summarized instructions for building a sod house.
What does homesteading look like today? This could easily be done on any suburban lot:
This page describes the original homesteading act:
Homesteading

In 1862, Congress passed the revolutionary Homestead Act that sent thousands of Americans west in pursuit of free land. Any man 21 years of age or over was eligible to stake out 160 acres of land for less than $20. After filing their intentions, homesteaders were required to live on the land, build a residence, and farm at least 10% of it within five years before a legal patent for the land was issued. After Alaska was purchased by the U.S., homesteaders began claiming land in Alaska. Homesteaders ranged from dairy and agricultural farmers to miners and wilderness pioneers living a subsistence lifestyle. Though homesteading in most of the U.S. began to rapidly diminish in the early 20th century, it remained a viable method of settling Alaska. The Homestead Act was finally repealed in 1976, though Alaska was granted an extension until 1986. In its 114 active years, 10% of U.S. land was settled under the act, including significant portions of Alaska.

See also: – Need a new hobby? Need extra income? Want to be the ultimate locavore? Consider urban farmingHow to keep chickens in your backyard and have fresh eggs every day (source: http://www.brainstuffshow.com/ )