The First Man

Today, July 31st ’22, is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Bill Kaysing. He was an American writer “for an alternative lifestyle”, “against the tide”, one who gave the government a hard time with his indomitable anarchoid behavior.
Thus, Kaysing had led a fairly regular life until beyond quarantine. Four years of war in the navy, degree in English literature and marriage with two daughters. Then a career as a clerk at an aerospace company called Rocketdyne. After that, he decided to totally change his life, overwhelmed by rampant pollution and the daily routine of 9-17 hours, typical of American offices.
Deciding to change your life, leave the “rat race” and dedicate yourself to a healthy existence, free from daily commitments and constraints. He divorced his first wife by marrying Ruth, also a writer, as he had become in the meantime.
He lived one adventure after another traveling by caravan and boat through the Nevada desert and California. Or, in San Francisco Bay, helping the homeless that abound in that area.
You achieved international fame in 1976 by writing “We never went to the Moon” proving, without a shadow of a doubt, that the government was the “enemy number 1” of the American people. It gave rise, thanks to a book, to an entire conspiratorial vein, I had to write in an article for an Australian magazine on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the first false moon landing .
It seems to me yesterday when I published a website in his honor in 2006. I never suspected that I would come into contact with his family members, thanks to whom, I obtained documents in his possession with which I could write the biography entitled “The fastest pen in the West ”. After all, it was an adventure for me too. Ciao Bill!

William Charles Kaysing

Buzz Aldrin: American Icon

Sotheby’s is thrilled to announce Buzz Aldrin: American Icon — the most important Space Exploration collection to come to market. The collection, consigned directly by Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin, who has carefully preserved the materials since his missions, includes the most important mission flown artifacts from both the Gemini XII and Apollo 11 missions.

 

Highlights include the jacket Aldrin wore on his historic journey to the Moon and back on Apollo 11; the famous broken circuit breaker switch that nearly ended the lives of the Apollo 11 crew, and the felt-tipped pen that saved them; the famous “Go Army, Beat Navy” banner Buzz brought with him on his Gemini XII spacewalk and exposed to the vacuum of space; complete mission-flown documents that were key to completing the mission, including the Apollo 11 LM Systems Activation Checklist, the LM Rendezvous Charts, Lunar Module and Command Module cue cards including the Apollo 11 EVA cue cards, the Rendezvous, Softsuit EVA, and Hardsuit EVA checklists from Gemini XII, as well as the Apollo 11 Summary Flight Plan and LM G&N Dictionary, flown lunar surface checklist and flight plan pages, flown flags, covers, and much more. Of note are the MTV VMA award statuette presented to Buzz, the “Original Moonman,” his Presidential Medal of Freedom, and other important materials relating to his life leading up to becoming an astronaut, as well as materials relating to his life and accolades following his historic moonwalk.

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(source: https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2022/buzz-aldrin-american-icon?locale=en )

Was it really all staged?

Have you ever heard some insane explanation of an impactful event in the world? That, in simple terms, is a conspiracy theory. As Britannica’s definition states, a conspiracy theory is “an attempt to explain harmful or tragic events as the result of the actions of a small powerful group”. These theories are all over the media and have opened a world of speculation regarding absolutely anything. Conspiracy theories can ridiculously range from the tragic death of, for example, Princess Diana, to suspecting that the Illuminati rule the world.

One of the most intriguing theories I’ve heard of is NASA faking the moon landing: the Moon Landing Hoax. This caught my attention tremendously because this event has had such a huge impact on the world’s and humans’ history, not to mention technology, that it would be appalling if it was actually staged.

Apollo 11 was the name given to the first-ever moon landing mission. This mission happened on July 20th 1969, eight years after President John F. Kennedy had set a national goal to land on the moon before the 1970s. On this mission, there were two American astronauts: Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Well-known Neil Armstrong was the first-ever man to land on the moon; Aldrin followed 19 minutes later. Notoriously, Armstrong said “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”, as he first stepped onto the moon.

Since the 1970s, conspiracy theorists have generated elaborate theories about this event. These stories have insulted all the people who worked hard in order to make the moon landing possible, in addition to all the courageous astronauts who risked their lives travelling into space for us to have more knowledge about the Earth. In 2002, conspiracy theorist Bart Sibrel called Aldrin “a coward and a liar” for staging the landing and the senior astronaut punched him in the face.

But where did it all start? Why do people think it is a hoax? American writer, Bill Kaysing, self-published a book called ‘We Never Went to the Moon: America’s Thirty Billion Dollar Swindle!’ in 1976, which convicts the US government of not being capable of landing on the moon. Kaysing, who used to work in a US space program, believes this because he supposedly accessed results of a secret study by NASA which stated that there was a 0.017% chance of success, meaning the mission was basically hopeless.

In short, moon landing deniers believe that the landing was actually performed in a film studio. The theorists insist that the famous footage holds evidence of the landing being fake. As for every conspiracy, there are some believers and some sceptics, and each will tell you a different side to the story.

As you can see, the flag seems to be waving, which is physically impossible in an environment with zero gravity or wind. This obviously raised the sceptics’ attention. Unfortunately for them, scientists have given the reason why it appears to be moving with the wind. The flag is not actually moving, not in the pictures nor in the video., but It is settling down after being placed, and air resistance makes it slower, so the photo was taken before it had completely settled.

There also appear to be many shadows going in different directions, which is used to prove that there were different light sources, hence the belief that the shadows are cast by studio lights. The believers argue that the sun was low so it distorts the shadows, and if there were multiple light sources there should be more shadows for each object so it wouldn’t make sense.

Furthermore, it is claimed that all the rocks we see in the photos are actually props. There seems to be the shape of a letter C in one of the rocks so it is considered proof that they faked them. This has been debunked by saying that the C doesn’t really appear on the NASA prints. agnified it looks like a hair or an unintentional mark that was transferred onto later copies. In fact, 32kg of moon rock have been collected through other 6 separate missions.

Finally, one of the most popular clues from the pictures is the fact that there are no visible stars. It is obviously common knowledge that the sky is full of stars, and one would assume that in space it would be even clearer, right? But actually, in none of NASA’s photos from the landing can we see stars. Debunkers say that the astronauts took photos focusing on bright white objects, so the technology plus the exposure of the camera would not capture vague or unclear subjects like stars.

There are hundreds of queries that suggest the moon landing was a hoax. Some claims are ridiculous and really step over the line, but some appear reasonable and fair. This is the beauty of all conspiracies. It is really up to everyone’s personal opinion to decide what to believe, but it is interesting to take a look at someone else’s opinions and explore different perspectives. What do you believe is the truth?

Sources

https://www.history.com/topics/space-exploration/moon-landing-1969

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/10/one-giant-lie-why-so-many-people-still-think-the-moon-landings-were-faked

https://www.theguardian.com/science/gallery/2009/jun/29/apollo-11-moon-landing-hoax

( https://outspokenpost.com/2022/05/17/was-it-really-all-staged/ )

‘Department of Truth’ #17 touches down on the Moon landing hoax

On the far end of the spectrum of weird beliefs — the way-out-there side — are the people who claim that the 1969 Apollo 11 Moon landing was faked on a Hollywood sound stage. James Tynion IV’s The Department of Truth, published by Image Comics, explores this grand old dame of conspiracy theories in issue #17. Perhaps the strangest aspect of the whole thing is that some people still believe it.

An early sense of wonderment and disbelief, historically, might be more understandable. A 1976 Gallup poll showed that 28% of Americans thought the first Moon landing could have been faked. You can almost see why people would not understand this strange technology that took us so far away. Now in the era of phones that act as mini-computers, denying the Moon landing seems far more laughable — and it is.

'Department of Truth' #17 touches down on the Moon landing hoax

Image Comics

In the issue, we see newly-elected President Richard Nixon discussing landing on the Moon with the future director of the Department of Truth, Lee Harvey Oswald. Importantly, Frank Capra, whose Why We Fight propaganda films were distributed to the public during World War II, is also there. Nixon needs to “get” the U.S. to the moon ahead of the Russians, and he wants to use Capra’s techniques, but Stanley Kubrick’s visions, to achieve it (Kubrick’s opus 2001: A Space Odyssey had been released in 1968).

The main belief behind Moon landing conspiracy theories is that the United States was behind the USSR in the space race, and it was of the utmost importance for us to win. In the world of The Department of Truth, where belief becomes reality, if people saw the U.S. as the dominant superpower, it would happen. And hey, if we didn’t make it to the Moon, then we would have imported all those Nazi scientists during the very real Operation Paperclip for nothing.

Many of the ideas of a faked Moon landing can be traced to Bill Kaysing who, in 1976, wrote a book called We Never Went to the Moon: America’s Thirty Billion Dollar Swindle (in keeping with the apparent rules for conspiracy theory books, it has a long, grandiose title and was self-published.) Two years later, the film Capricorn One (starring O. J. Simpson!) was released. This movie was to the Moon landing what Wag the Dog would become to false flag enthusiasts. It was a “what if?” kind of sci-fi film built around the premise of a faked space mission. And of course, since it was in a movie, it had to be real — if it can be imagined, it must have been created.

Ultimately Kubrick became the hottest name attached to Moon landing conspiracy theories with stories claiming he worked on a sound stage at Area 51 for 18 months to perfect his greatest cinematic masterpiece. Of course, as is common with conspiracy theories, this story both downplays the real, hard work that went into the Apollo 11 mission, while also proposing a hoax that would probably take even more effort to pull off.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of Kubrick’s implication is the idea that he hid messages about the Moon landing hoax in his other cinematic masterpiece, 1980’s The Shining (it is quite possible that Kubrick was trolling the conspiracy crowd by dressing Danny in an Apollo sweater.) Joke articles have since fooled countless people into thinking Kubrick actually did this, and a 2002 French mockumentary, Dark Side of the Moon, didn’t help matters. And as more information came out about MK-Ultra and COINTELPRO, it became easier for Americans to believe that the official stories put out by the government about all sorts of events had been staged or mythologized.

"Department of Truth" Moon landing hoaxAll this has led scientists to devote more time and energy than they should to debunk these ideas, although that’s probably more effective than Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin’s alternative. When confronted, he punched a Moon landing conspiracy theorist in 2002 — don’t worry, Aldrin wasn’t charged with assault. Will Smith, eat your heart out.

(source: https://aiptcomics.com/2022/04/01/moon-landing-hoax-department-of-truth/ )

NASA Artemis Moon landing delayed by ‘several years’ as costs go ‘underreported’

NASA's Orion capsule is scheduled to carry astronauts on the crewed Artemis missions later this decade
NASA’s Orion capsule is scheduled to carry astronauts on the crewed Artemis missions later this decade   –   Copyright  John Raoux/AP Photo
By Tom Bateman  with Reuters

NASA’s Artemis mission to put astronauts back on the Moon by 2024 is running late and getting expensive, an assessment by the space agency’s watchdog has found.

A new report by NASA’s inspector general (OIG) found that the agency was likely to overshoot its 2024 target by “several years” as knock-on delays and technical challenges impacted the mission’s timetable.

The OIG also criticised the cost of the Moon landing project, saying NASA “lacks a comprehensive and accurate cost estimate” of the programme.

In all, the mission could cost $93 billion (€82 billion) by 2025, the OIG said.

Last week, the US space agency pushed back the expected date for a lunar landing to 2025. The delay was due in part to legal action by Jeff Bezos-owned Blue Origin, which sued NASA after losing out in a bid to build a Moon landing vehicle for the Artemis programme.

Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo
Blue Origin’s attempt to sue NASA was rejected by a judge earlier this monthTony Gutierrez/AP Photo

In a statement, NASA said the US Congress had not allocated the agency “sufficient funds” to award contracts for Moon landing vehicles to more than one private company.

NASA said the delay was also down to “first-time development challenges,” and the 2024 deadline set by the former Trump administration “not being technically feasible”.

NASA ‘underreporting’ the cost

In its report, the OIG found that NASA uses a rough estimate for the cost of the first three Artemis missions “that excludes $25 billion (€22 billion) for key activities related to planned missions beyond Artemis III”.

The report also accused NASA of “failing to develop an official cost estimate” for the Artemis programme and said it was “underreporting the true funding requirements” of the exploration project.

NASA’s cost estimate for the programme excluded spending on development of the Space Launch System (SLS) – the replacement for the Space Shuttle launch vehicle that was retired in 2011 – as well as the Gateway, a space station orbiting the Moon that is planned to serve as an outpost for astronauts on the Artemis programme.

In its cost estimate, the OIG said NASA was likely to spend $93 billion (€82 billion) on the programme by 2025 and faced a $4.1 billion (€3.6 billion) cost-per-launch for at least the first four Artemis missions.

In a written response, NASA said it had restructured its Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate organisation to ensure effective management and that it agreed it should look for “measurable cost reduction targets” in its Exploration Systems Development arm.

When will we land on the Moon?

Artemis I, the first stage of the lunar landing mission, was originally scheduled to blast off this month, but NASA’s own estimates have pushed the launch of the uncrewed lunar orbiter to February 2022.

The OIG report is more cautious, saying Artemis I has a “higher probability of launch – in our estimation – by summer 2022”.

Artemis II – which will see a human crew fly 40,000 miles beyond the Moon before returning to Earth – faces knock-on delays from the Artemis I mission, the OIG said.

SpaceX/Nasa via AP
SpaceX won the contract to develop a moon lander for NASA’s Artemis missionsSpaceX/Nasa via AP

A key issue for the mission is the availability of parts. To save money, NASA plans to re-use parts of the Orion spacecraft used in Artemis I for the follow-up mission.

Delays to Artemis I could therefore set back subsequent launches.

“NASA is likely to face schedule delays due to the reuse and installation of Orion components following Artemis I and a tight delivery schedule of the Orion service module,” the OIG report said.

Artemis III, the mission that would see humans set foot on the Moon for the first time since 1972, faces numerous issues of its own.

A moon lander due to be built by Elon Musk’s SpaceX is likely to be delayed by 3.4 years, according to an OIG estimate based on previous space flight development programmes and delays caused by Blue Origin’s lawsuit.

NASA’s efforts to develop the next generation of spacesuits is another bottleneck, the OIG said, after the agency was forced to fast-track its schedule to meet former president Donald Trump’s 2024 moon landing deadline.

“The suits will not be ready for flight until May 2025 at the earliest,” the report stated. ( Source: https://www.euronews.com/next/2021/11/16/nasa-artemis-moon-landing-delayed-by-several-years-as-costs-go-underreported )

‘The big quit’ as millions leave jobs in US – BBC News

Millions of Americans are leaving their jobs in what economists are calling “the great resignation”. 2021 has seen a huge number of people in the US change their careers – last month four million quit their jobs. BBC’s US correspondent Michelle Fleury went to meet people in Kentucky, where people are quitting at a higher rate than in many other states.

Fake Holiday: First Moon Landing

Today is the anniversary of the first Moon landing on 20 July, 1969. The first of many other fake landings (and everything else we have done in space).

With that in mind, here is an old article on fake Moon landing. There are many on the internet as well as videos. You can find more on this blog if you type in “moon landing” in the search bar. Go to Duckduckgo.com to find a ton more.

Fake Moon Landing

One way to introduce people to the flat earth is by talking about the moon landing. You don’t start off by saying it was fake but you introduce facts that makes you friend start to question the narrative. For example, ask how Gus Grissom was able to talk on the microphone with a background noise of 140 decipals. Then introduce another fact. Of course, you can just show him this or other videos.

We know the moon landing was fake because there is no other planet out there. I had learned about the fake moon landing years before I heard about the flat earth and I’m sure you did, too, if you were investigating government lies at an earlier date. Then, when I learned about the flat earth, it makes sense that the moon landing was fake, too. Unfortunately, there are good people who are Truth Seekers that know the moon landing was fake but still believes in the heliocentric model of the universe. God willing, in time they will be open to know about the flat earth.