Bart Sibrel: Moon Landing 50th anniversary

What the notoriously corrupt United States federal government is claiming is to have sent men to the moon in 1969, on the very FIRST attempt, even though right here on earth Mt. Everest and the South Pole took NUMEROUS tries before success, allegedly accomplishing this amazing feat with FIFTY YEAR OLDER technology (a cell phone has ONE MILLION times more computing power than ALL of NASA did back then), yet FIFTY years later the farthest NASA can now send astronauts from Earth is only 1/1000th the distance as claimed half a century ago, despite there being five decades more advancements in rockets and computers.

If Toyota claimed they made a car FIFTY years ago that could travel 50,000 miles on one gallon of gasoline, yet today their best car can only go 50 miles per gallon, or 1/1000th the distance, would not their forgery be incredibly obvious? If it were not for people’s emotional attachment to the fifty year unrepeatable moon landing claim, also with only 1/1000th the distance capable five decades later, they would otherwise easily recognize it as the fraud that it sadly is.

The alleged moon landings are the only technological claim in the entire history of the world, such as the first automobile, airplane, or nuclear power, which was not far surpassed in capability fifty years later, much less could not be duplicated by any nation on earth fifty years later. The supposed moon landings are also the only time in the entire history of the world that such claimed breakthrough technology was deliberately destroyed afterwards, actually only done so to hide the evidence of their fraud.

Seeing how it is IMPOSSIBLE for technology to go backwards and today NASA can only send astronauts 1/1000th the distance from the Earth as was claimed FIFTY years ago on the very FIRST attempt with FIVE DECADES OLDER technology, the only remaining conclusion is that the 1969 claim was a government forgery. It is that simple.

How Moon Landing Conspiracy Theories Spread Before the Internet

by Matt Novak
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Conspiracy theories about the Moon landing have been around for years. Decades, in fact. And while it’s easier than ever to spread false stories thanks to the internet, the belief that humans never landed on the Moon is way older than the web.
How did people learn about Moon landing conspiracy theories before the internet? People of the 20th century had a strange and primitive technology known as books.
The 1974 self-published book We Never Went to the Moon by Bill Kaysing was the first lengthy discussion on the topic committed to paper. Kaysing, who died in 2005, was a technical writer at space contractor Rocketdyne in the 1950s, which led some people to think that Kaysing knew what he was talking about when he insisted that the Moon landings were actually filmed at a production studio in Area 51. People believed Kaysing despite the fact that he would sometimes admit he knew “zero” about rockets.
Kaysing didn’t have to work too hard to convince an already skeptical public that the Apollo space program and the first Moon landing on July 20, 1969 was a sham. Americans of the late 1960s and early 1970s were already living through one of the most disheartening eras of the 20th century, with everything from the Vietnam War to the corruption of Watergate leading the average person to distrust anything their government might be telling them.
The Knight newspaper company in July 1970 found that a whopping 30 percent of Americans believed the Moon landing had been faked. And a Gallup poll in 1976 found that 28 percent of Americans believed that the Moon landing had been staged by the U.S. government—pretty consistent findings throughout the 1970s.

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Kaysing thought he had a lot of reasons to believe the U.S. government needed to fake the Moon landing. First, he insisted that it simply wasn’t possible given the technology of the day. This argument was made through a lot of hand-waving and by suggesting that his firsthand knowledge from Rocketdyne gave him some special insight.
“As a witness to many rocket engine tests at the Santa Susana lab, I saw many failures, blowups and premature engine cutoffs due to incipient disaster,” Kaysing wrote in his book. “Even after the relatively modest Atlas engine cluster was accepted by the Air Force for use in the Atlas ICBM, failures occurred with repeated regularity.”
But his most damning evidence that the Moon landing was a hoax was perhaps the most easy to discredit. Specifically, Kaysing wrote, repeatedly, that the absence of stars in the photos taken on the Moon proved humans never went there.
“There are no stars in any of their pictures,” Kaysing told a New Jersey newspaper in 1977. “If they were taken on the moon there would have been some stars in evidence.” The suggestion was that this was some kind of oversight on the part of NASA and proved that it was all fake.
The reality? There are a lot of good reasons that you don’t see stars in the photos from the Moon. But people here in the 21st century probably understand that today better than they could in the 1970s. Anyone who’s used a smartphone to take pictures when there’s a single annoying light source can get easily frustrated. Astronauts are exposed to a lot more direct sunlight in space, so if you expose the photo using an appropriate aperture for the surface of the Moon, you’re not going to capture the relatively little light from stars.
If you set the camera’s aperture wide to capture the stars, you’d get something like this demonstration from a great debunker of the Moon hoax people by VideoFromSpace on YouTube.
Kaysing thought he had a lot of reasons to believe the U.S. government needed to fake the Moon landing. First, he insisted that it simply wasn’t possible given the technology of the day. This argument was made through a lot of hand-waving and by suggesting that his firsthand knowledge from Rocketdyne gave him some special insight.
“As a witness to many rocket engine tests at the Santa Susana lab, I saw many failures, blowups and premature engine cutoffs due to incipient disaster,” Kaysing wrote in his book. “Even after the relatively modest Atlas engine cluster was accepted by the Air Force for use in the Atlas ICBM, failures occurred with repeated regularity.”
But his most damning evidence that the Moon landing was a hoax was perhaps the most easy to discredit. Specifically, Kaysing wrote, repeatedly, that the absence of stars in the photos taken on the Moon proved humans never went there.
“There are no stars in any of their pictures,” Kaysing told a New Jersey newspaper in 1977. “If they were taken on the moon there would have been some stars in evidence.” The suggestion was that this was some kind of oversight on the part of NASA and proved that it was all fake.
The reality? There are a lot of good reasons that you don’t see stars in the photos from the Moon. But people here in the 21st century probably understand that today better than they could in the 1970s. Anyone who’s used a smartphone to take pictures when there’s a single annoying light source can get easily frustrated. Astronauts are exposed to a lot more direct sunlight in space, so if you expose the photo using an appropriate aperture for the surface of the Moon, you’re not going to capture the relatively little light from stars.
If you set the camera’s aperture wide to capture the stars, you’d get something like this demonstration from a great debunker of the Moon hoax people by VideoFromSpace on YouTube.
Another one of Kaysing’s claims was that acclaimed director Stanley Kubrick was probably involved in faking the Moon landings. Kubrick’s 1968 movie 2001: A Space Odyssey included some of the most impressive special effects work that had been done to date and it helped create the theory that Kubrick had actually directed the footage we know today as the Apollo landings.
“While ‘2001’ was being filmed, Kubrick and his crew consulted with nearly 70 industrial and aerospace corporations, universities, observatories, weather bureaus, laboratories and other institutions to ensure that the film would be technically accurate,” Kaysing wrote. “Had this been done for ASP without the cover of ‘2001’, much suspicion would have been directed towards those making the inquires.”
What’s ASP? According to Kaysing, that stands for the “Apollo Simulation Project.” In fact, Kaysing even points to the ballooning budget of the film as more evidence that Kubrick was in on the moon hoax, insinuating that the director was paid by NASA to stage a cover-up.
Kaysing’s book also included photos of hotels in Las Vegas—the place where Kaysing said the astronauts lived while they were supposed to be on the Moon. In fact, Kaysing suggests that the astronauts insisted on Vegas because guys like Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and their publicity “managers” wanted to live it up in style.
Hard to argue with that, right?
Another piece of “evidence” that Kaysing spends considerable time on throughout the book is the fact that the practice sessions that astronauts conducted look like a fake Moon landing. Admittedly, I made the same joke back in 2014 before I had even heard of Kaysing’s book.
And the photos really do look like prep for a fake landing. But they’re not. They’re just training. Obviously these photos have stuck around and are used on the internet as “evidence” even today.

Neil Armstrong practices using a video camera during a lunar surface simulation at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston in April of 1969, three months before he would actually walk on the Moon
Ralph Rene is another Moon hoaxer who gained prominence before most American were online, having published a book called MENSA Lectures, retitled The Last Skeptic Of Science after Mensa reportedly sued for using the name without permission. But it was Rene’s second book, published in 1994, that made him a folk hero of the Moon hoax community. Called NASA Mooned America!, the book, which is still available on Amazon, has many similarities to Kaysing’s work in the 1970s, but includes some even more outlandish claims.
One of the most damning pieces of evidence that Rene has? The astronauts don’t look sufficiently excited upon their return. Rene published this photo to show that the astronauts were actually embarrassed that they’d just lied to the American public:
(source. https://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/how-moon-landing-conspiracy-theories-spread-before-the-1835483705 )

MIT Science Reporter — “Landing on the Moon”

This 1966 MIT Science Reporter television program details the development and construction of the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM), the only vehicle of the three Apollo spacecraft modules that actually lands on the moon. Project engineer Thomas Kelly gives a tour of the LEM at Grumman Aircraft in Long Island, NY, and demonstrates the LEM Automatic Checkout System, while test pilot Robert Smyth demonstrates the lunar landing simulator via an electronic computer-controlled model of the Moon. The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

Moon Landing at 50: A Guide to TV Specials Celebrating Apollo 11’s 1969 Feat

Multiple television channels including National Geographic, Smithsonian and Discovery will air special coverage throughout the month.

Multiple television channels including National Geographic, Smithsonian and Discovery will air special coverage throughout the month.

July 20, 2019, marks 50 years since Apollo 11 made its historic landing on the moon. Since then, Hollywood has taken creative liberties to celebrate the feat, part of the space race against the Soviet Union. Projects include the Damien Chazelle film First Man, Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and Al Reinert’s For All MankindMoon landing enthusiasts (or disbelievers) can celebrate Apollo 11’s landing by watching such Hollywood projects, but multiple television networks including National Geographic, Smithsonian and Discovery will air their own special coverage throughout the month.The channels will commemorate the lunar landing with programs such as new episodes of Smithsonian’s Apollo’s Moon Shot, Chasing the Moon from PBS and BBC America’s Wonders of the Moon.Suit up and read on for a list of Apollo 11-inspired TV programs.July 5
Apollo: Back to the Moon (6 p.m. ET/PT, National Geographic)July 6
Lost Tapes, The: Apollo 13 (3 p.m., Smithsonian)

July 7
Apollo’s Moon Shot: Rocket Fever (6 a.m., Smithsonian)
Apollo’s Moon Shot: Triumph and Tragedy (7 a.m., Smithsonian)
Apollo’s Moon Shot: One Giant Leap (8 a.m., Smithsonian)
Apollo: Missions to the Moon (9 p.m., National Geographic)
The Day We Walked the Moon (9 p.m., Smithsonian)

July 8
The Armstrong Tapes (9 p.m., National Geographic)
Challenger Disaster: The Final Mission (10 p.m., National Geographic)
Chasing the Moon (9 p.m., PBS)

July 9
Apollo: Back to the Moon (9 p.m., National Geographic)

July 10
Nova: Back to the Moon (8 p.m., PBS)

July 14
Moon Landing: The Lost Tapes (10 p.m., History)

July 16
Nova: Apollo’s Daring Mission (10 p.m., PBS)

July 17
8 Days: to the Moon and Back (9 p.m., PBS)

July 18
When We Were Apollo (8:30 p.m., PBS)
Apollo’s Moon Shot: Brink of Disaster (9 p.m., Smithsonian)

July 19
NASA’s Giant Leaps: Past and Future – Celebrating Apollo 50th as We Go Forward to the Moon (1 p.m., Science)
Wonders of the Moon (10 p.m., BBC America)

July 20
Apollo: The Forgotten Films (8 p.m., Discovery)
Moon Landing Live (9 p.m., BBC America)
Confessions From Space: Apollo (10 p.m., Discovery)

(source: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/apollo-11-moon-landing-1969-tv-shows-celebrating-50th-anniversary-1222497 )

Apollo 11: birth of a conspiracy theory

Earlier this year, Australian magazine New Dawn had asked me to write an article on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the conquest of the Moon. I sent them a writing describing how Bill Kaysing got involved in the lunar landings and the origin of his book We never went to the Moon. The article comes out in the July-August ’19 issue.

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New Dawn website: https://www.newdawnmagazine.com/

Man dumps bucket of water on homeless woman from San Francisco rooftop in viral video

As San Francisco’s homeless crisis grows more dire, its residents have repeatedly come under fire for mistreatment of those in the homeless community — from accusations of “anti-homeless” architecture to threats of violence against homeless camps.
Now, a video that shows a man from a rooftop in San Francisco pouring a bucket of water on a homeless woman has gone viral, forcing viewers to grapple with cruelty toward the homeless population.
The video, first reported by NBC Bay Area, shows a man dumping a bucket of water from a rooftop onto a homeless woman, her encampment and her belongings.
Witnesses told NBC Bay Area that it wasn’t the first time, and that repeated instances of water dumping have taken place in the same building — presumably to ward off homeless people.
The instance that was recorded on video, The Guardian noted, was the second attack on the woman in the same day. She was attempting to move her belongings following the first attack.
The San Francisco Police Department encourages the victim to step forward and report the crime, officials told USA TODAY. Neither individual has been identified.
They classify this as a misdemeanor battery, NBC Bay Area said.
A Twitter user, Jim Cruz-Youll, is offering a $500 reward for any information regarding the identity of the attacker, which was matched by multiple others on the platform.
“Homeless women are frequent victims of sexual assault and domestic abuse,” said Cruz-Youll. “Vigilantes can’t be allowed to attack people and just wander away without consequences. I hope the reward will encourage people to step up on the record with information so that there might be a chance at justice.”
The San Francisco Human Services Agency did not respond to requests for comment from USA TODAY. (source: https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/06/26/san-francisco-man-dumps-bucket-water-homeless-woman-goes-viral/1569285001/ )

Top Undeniable Facts That Prove Mark Dice is River Phoenix

River Phoenix mystery

River Phoenix €“ older brother of Joaquin Phoenix €“ died in October 1993 at the age of twenty-three. Phoenix is said to have suffered drug-induced heart failure outside the Hollywood nightclub The Viper Room. At the time of his death, Phoenix was considered something of a teen idol, having appeared in Stand By Me, Running On Empty and My Own Private Idaho. Of course, where a celebrity dies, conspiracy theories shall follow. One theory posits that Pheonix didn’t overdose, but was actually murdered. The proof? Apparently three days after his autopsy, the results were announced as inconclusive. No needle marks were found on Phoenix’s body. His death also coincided with an investigation into his family, who were apparently members of a local cult. Supposedly Phoenix angered the cult by openly discussing his sexuality, and so they considered him an expendable liability. A separate theory claims that Phoenix wasn’t murdered, but actually faked his death. Apparently Phoenix was enticed by the world of espionage, and decided the only way to become a spy was if the world thought he was dead. After all, Phoenix is said to have hated Hollywood (owing to his humanitarian stance). Several clues lead to believe that River Phoenix has since resurfaced as political activist, under the name of Mark Dice, and he now writes books about The Illuminati and has 1.5 million subscribers on YouTube.

Top Undeniable Facts That Prove Mark Dice is River Phoenix

How to grow food in an apartment or condo

(Taylor Logan/CBC)

A few months ago, my roommate Alex and I had a revelation. As we were hauling overfilled bags of trash down the hall to the disposal for the third time that week, it hit us: How were four people producing this much garbage?
Our three-bedroom apartment west of Toronto had no compost bin. Our kitchen blue bins were often overflowing with recycling, but it made little difference to the amount of trash. Single-use plastic made up a large part of our weekly garbage run and a lot of it came from packaging for produce. We decided to begin growing our own food.
Most people think that cultivating a garden in an apartment is impossible, especially being eight floors up. Some buildings have strict rules — ours says you can’t hang things off the balcony. But finding workarounds was one of the easiest things I’ve ever done.
We started by creating our own vermicompost bin, which uses worms to compost food scraps. But we quickly realized how much fertilizer the worms were producing. We considered dumping it in a local forest or the flower beds outside our apartment, but decided instead to create a garden of our own.
We ran out to the store the next day, filling our cart with seeds, small compostable pots and a shovel. We began with 10 seed-filled pots sitting on our kitchen windowsill, which we watered every day with a spray bottle. We killed four within the week, but we replanted and adjusted. From over-watering to too much sun, we had to watch our emerging plants like hawks.
Within three weeks, we had 10 little seedlings, including lettuce, tomatoes, broccoli, snap peas, mint, basil, a dwarf sunflower … as well as catnip for our feline friend, Dave.
Never having had much of a green thumb, my roommate and I had plenty of pots from previously owned (and accidentally killed) house plants. This proved beneficial around three weeks later. The plants had become too big and needed to be transferred to new homes.
Soon, we were obsessed. With the leftover pots, we planted more. Some wildflowers for the bees, another sunflower. We even started to plant and regrow the vegetables we were buying from the store.
We moved the plants outdoors the weekend after Victoria Day, putting them in metal and compostable planters hanging on the inside of our balcony. A few weeks later, we bought a wooden ladder and hung pots from it for the flowers. Thirteen weeks after we first had the idea, our once-empty balcony was filled with blooming life.
Soon, the benefits of our garden will be reaped and we will have delicious, fresh food — with no waste in sight.
An apartment garden cheat sheet:
Use the space to your advantage. If you have a balcony, hang planters. If you have a large enough windowsill, keep your plants there. Consider vertical planters to conserve space. Be creative.
If you don’t have enough lighting or lack a balcony, consider using grow lights for minigreenhouses.
If you lack the funds for such equipment, grow veggies that thrive in shady areas (e.g. lettuce, carrots, garlic, potatoes).
For overly sunny apartments, grow tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, beans and corn.
Watch how your plants grow. If they’re wilting, water them. If they start to lose their colour, give them more light. To grow a successful garden, you have to pay attention to what your plants are saying to you.  (source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/what-on-earth-newsletter-garden-growing-climate-change-cartoon-1.5192851 )